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I'm a lover of pop culture and a hater of Bad Advertising. This blog is a tirade against Bad Advertising. It's also about Art, Packaging and Design.The Good, The Bad, The Ugly effects of it. If this offends you : I apologise in advance ;)

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twitter.com/GenerationDon:

    fastcompany:

A look at the six most popular newsletters on TinyLetter and what they’re doing right.
So you want to start a newsletter. The medium is having a moment, a phenomenon even the New York Times' esteemed media critic has noticed. The time to jump on the bandwagon, before brands take over and ruin everything, is now.
But how? Fast Company spoke with TinyLetter, the platform of choice for newsletter writers, about what aspiring email tycoons can learn from its most popular emailers.

These are the six most popular and influential personal newsletters, in no particular order, according to TinyLetter’s internal numbers.
Read More>

    fastcompany:

    A look at the six most popular newsletters on TinyLetter and what they’re doing right.

    So you want to start a newsletter. The medium is having a moment, a phenomenon even the New York Timesesteemed media critic has noticed. The time to jump on the bandwagon, before brands take over and ruin everything, is now.

    But how? Fast Company spoke with TinyLetter, the platform of choice for newsletter writers, about what aspiring email tycoons can learn from its most popular emailers.

    image

    These are the six most popular and influential personal newsletters, in no particular order, according to TinyLetter’s internal numbers.

    Read More>

    — 1 week ago with 49 notes

    fastcompany:

    evangotlib:

    parislemon:

    A sort of strange ad for Apple. But not a bad one. Quite fun. Nice Heisenberg shout-out as well as old logo throw-back at the end. Do I smell a comeback?

    I love this.  Gets back to the message that at the end of the day technology is inherently personal despite being a constant part of everyday life for almost everyone.

    This new Apple ad celebrates the various ways people personalize their Macbooks.

    — 1 week ago with 166 notes

    Creating a soulful brand!

    — 1 week ago with 1 note
    Facebook Still Drives More Traffic Than Any Other Social Network →

    fastcompany:

    For a while, everyone was all but certain that Facebook had peaked and was heading toward obsolescence. Well, as uncool as it might be, teens haven’t abandoned the social network, and a new report finds Facebook continues to lead in social referrals by a wide margin. Take note, marketers.

    Read More>

    — 1 week ago with 35 notes
    spaceplasma:

Secret Life of Michio Kaku
Every childhood is made up of roadblocks and opportunities. And interviewing our “Secret Life” subjects, we hear a lot about both. But we’d never heard a story quite like the one Michio Kaku told us:
“My parents were born in California. However, during World War II 100,000 Japanese-Americans were incarcerated in large relocation camps. So my parents never had a chance. Their property was confiscated. They lived behind barbed wires and machine guns from 1942 to 1946. And I was born afterwards, when my parents were dirt poor.”
Somehow, after the war, and after their release from the internment camps, Michio’s parents worked to rebuild their lives. They started out with nothing, but put everything they did have into creating a better life for their children. And when Michio began to show that he was more than a little prodigious as a teen scientist, they went along. They went along, even with limited resources and with virtually no idea of what was behind (or could be the consequences) of Michio’s sometimes more-than-a-little-risky boyhood experiments:
“So one day I went up to my mom and I said, ‘Mom, can I have permission to build a 2.3-million electron-volt atom smasher—a betatron—in the garage?’ And my mom stared at me, and she said, ‘Sure. Why not? And don’t forget to take out the garbage.’ So, I went out and took out the garbage. And then I went to Westinghouse. I got 400 pounds of transformer steel, 22 miles of copper wire, and built a 2.3-million electron-volt betatron in the garage. The wire was so heavy, I put the wire on the goal post [of the nearby high school football field] and I gave it to my mother. She ran with this strand of wire to the 50-yard line. My father grabbed it, ran to the goalpost and we wound 22 miles of copper wire on the football field. Well, the magnetic field was so powerful—about 20,000 times the Earth’s magnetic field. If you were to walk by my atom smasher, it would pull the fillings out of your teeth—that’s how powerful the magnet was going to be.”
When Michio actually plugged in his atom smasher, it did, of course, blow out every fuse in his house and likely every fuse for miles around—yet another kid scientist who made the lights go out and the authorities shake their fists (while grudgingly admitting that the kid was pretty smart).
But that wasn’t my big takeaway from Michio’s story.
What grabbed me was that his parents—uneducated about science, returning to the world after years of imprisonment “behind barbed wire and machine guns”—were more than willing to wrap 22 miles of a different kind of wire around the goalposts of a football field… all because they loved their son, had faith in him and his ideas, and wanted him to become the person he was clearly meant to be.
Seems like it all paid off.
Source: PBS.org
Credit: Tom Miller

    spaceplasma:

    Secret Life of Michio Kaku

    Every childhood is made up of roadblocks and opportunities. And interviewing our “Secret Life” subjects, we hear a lot about both. But we’d never heard a story quite like the one Michio Kaku told us:

    “My parents were born in California. However, during World War II 100,000 Japanese-Americans were incarcerated in large relocation camps. So my parents never had a chance. Their property was confiscated. They lived behind barbed wires and machine guns from 1942 to 1946. And I was born afterwards, when my parents were dirt poor.”

    Somehow, after the war, and after their release from the internment camps, Michio’s parents worked to rebuild their lives. They started out with nothing, but put everything they did have into creating a better life for their children. And when Michio began to show that he was more than a little prodigious as a teen scientist, they went along. They went along, even with limited resources and with virtually no idea of what was behind (or could be the consequences) of Michio’s sometimes more-than-a-little-risky boyhood experiments:

    “So one day I went up to my mom and I said, ‘Mom, can I have permission to build a 2.3-million electron-volt atom smasher—a betatron—in the garage?’ And my mom stared at me, and she said, ‘Sure. Why not? And don’t forget to take out the garbage.’ So, I went out and took out the garbage. And then I went to Westinghouse. I got 400 pounds of transformer steel, 22 miles of copper wire, and built a 2.3-million electron-volt betatron in the garage. The wire was so heavy, I put the wire on the goal post [of the nearby high school football field] and I gave it to my mother. She ran with this strand of wire to the 50-yard line. My father grabbed it, ran to the goalpost and we wound 22 miles of copper wire on the football field. Well, the magnetic field was so powerful—about 20,000 times the Earth’s magnetic field. If you were to walk by my atom smasher, it would pull the fillings out of your teeth—that’s how powerful the magnet was going to be.”

    When Michio actually plugged in his atom smasher, it did, of course, blow out every fuse in his house and likely every fuse for miles around—yet another kid scientist who made the lights go out and the authorities shake their fists (while grudgingly admitting that the kid was pretty smart).

    But that wasn’t my big takeaway from Michio’s story.

    What grabbed me was that his parents—uneducated about science, returning to the world after years of imprisonment “behind barbed wire and machine guns”—were more than willing to wrap 22 miles of a different kind of wire around the goalposts of a football field… all because they loved their son, had faith in him and his ideas, and wanted him to become the person he was clearly meant to be.

    Seems like it all paid off.

    Source: PBS.org

    Credit: Tom Miller

    (via newsweek)

    — 1 week ago with 4157 notes

    newsweek:

    Happy 30th Birthday, Purple Rain!

    (Source: youtube.com)

    — 1 week ago with 88 notes
    newsweek:

Lance Corporal Victor Lu’s friends in his Marine unit—the 3rd Battalion 5th Marine Regiment, part of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force that fought in the brutal battle to retake the Iraqi city of Fallujah from insurgents in late 2004—used to call him “Buddha.” The young Vietnamese-American man was 6 feet 3 inches tall, a black belt in Ju Si Tang Chinese kung fu and among the physically strongest men in his unit. But the imposing strength and physique belied a gentle, affable nature. Hence the nickname, which Lu liked so much he scribbled it onto the back of his Kevlar vest.
He had grown up in Los Angeles, not far from the University of Southern California, the eldest son of six children born to Nu and Xuong Lu, his mother and father. His parents had fled the country in the wake of the 1975 American withdrawal—and Communist takeover—of that country. Roughly 800,000 Vietnamese left the country from 1975 to 1995, with more than half of them settling in the United States.
Like many other young Americans, he had enlisted in the Marines after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and hoped, after the war, to join the Los Angeles Police Department. Before he went back for his second tour—before the assault on Fallujah—he told a friend he believed deeply in the mission. “We are bringing freedom,” he said, “to people who deserve it.”

He would not return from Iraq alive. In the early morning of November 13, 2004, the “3-5” was going house to house in Fallujah. When one front door jammed, Lu’s fellow Marines called on him to use his bulk and strength as a battering ram. He rammed his shoulder into the door, it popped open, and almost immediately Lu began taking fire from three insurgents inside. He absorbed eight or nine rounds before his unit mates could return fire. He slumped to the floor, mortally wounded. He was 22 years old.
Vietnam and Iraq Now Inextricably Linked as U.S. Geopolitical Disasters

    newsweek:

    Lance Corporal Victor Lu’s friends in his Marine unit—the 3rd Battalion 5th Marine Regiment, part of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force that fought in the brutal battle to retake the Iraqi city of Fallujah from insurgents in late 2004—used to call him “Buddha.” The young Vietnamese-American man was 6 feet 3 inches tall, a black belt in Ju Si Tang Chinese kung fu and among the physically strongest men in his unit. But the imposing strength and physique belied a gentle, affable nature. Hence the nickname, which Lu liked so much he scribbled it onto the back of his Kevlar vest.

    He had grown up in Los Angeles, not far from the University of Southern California, the eldest son of six children born to Nu and Xuong Lu, his mother and father. His parents had fled the country in the wake of the 1975 American withdrawal—and Communist takeover—of that country. Roughly 800,000 Vietnamese left the country from 1975 to 1995, with more than half of them settling in the United States.

    Like many other young Americans, he had enlisted in the Marines after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and hoped, after the war, to join the Los Angeles Police Department. Before he went back for his second tour—before the assault on Fallujah—he told a friend he believed deeply in the mission. “We are bringing freedom,” he said, “to people who deserve it.”

    He would not return from Iraq alive. In the early morning of November 13, 2004, the “3-5” was going house to house in Fallujah. When one front door jammed, Lu’s fellow Marines called on him to use his bulk and strength as a battering ram. He rammed his shoulder into the door, it popped open, and almost immediately Lu began taking fire from three insurgents inside. He absorbed eight or nine rounds before his unit mates could return fire. He slumped to the floor, mortally wounded. He was 22 years old.

    Vietnam and Iraq Now Inextricably Linked as U.S. Geopolitical Disasters

    — 1 week ago with 101 notes
    newsweek:

About 60 miles from the site of the deadly 2011 nuclear disaster in Fukushima prefecture, inside a former silicon chip manufacturing facility owned by the Japanese computer company Fujitsu, a small team of highly trained engineers are working on one of the company’s hottest new products.
Fujitsu’s marketing team claims it’s already proving a hit with their oldest—and youngest—consumers. It’s so popular, in fact, it’s probably just the first in a long line of related Fujitsu products. The product is lettuce. Like the giant monolith in Stanley Kubrick’s 2001, this new head of lettuce is simultaneously a product of this factory’s past and the future.
Fujitsu is a space-age R&D innovator with sprawling, specialized factories. But several of its facilities, including this one, went dark when the company tightened its belt and reorganized its product lines after the 2008 global financial crisis. Now in the aftermath, it has retrofitted this facilities to serve tomorrow’s vegetable consumers, who will pay for a better-than-organic product, and who enjoy a bowl of iceberg more if they know it was monitored by thousands of little sensors.
The Internet Of Things Meets Hydroponics: How To Grow A Better Vegetable

    newsweek:

    About 60 miles from the site of the deadly 2011 nuclear disaster in Fukushima prefecture, inside a former silicon chip manufacturing facility owned by the Japanese computer company Fujitsu, a small team of highly trained engineers are working on one of the company’s hottest new products.

    Fujitsu’s marketing team claims it’s already proving a hit with their oldest—and youngest—consumers. It’s so popular, in fact, it’s probably just the first in a long line of related Fujitsu products. The product is lettuce. Like the giant monolith in Stanley Kubrick’s 2001, this new head of lettuce is simultaneously a product of this factory’s past and the future.

    Fujitsu is a space-age R&D innovator with sprawling, specialized factories. But several of its facilities, including this one, went dark when the company tightened its belt and reorganized its product lines after the 2008 global financial crisis. Now in the aftermath, it has retrofitted this facilities to serve tomorrow’s vegetable consumers, who will pay for a better-than-organic product, and who enjoy a bowl of iceberg more if they know it was monitored by thousands of little sensors.

    The Internet Of Things Meets Hydroponics: How To Grow A Better Vegetable

    (via fastcompany)

    — 1 week ago with 252 notes
    sciencefriday:

Did you know you can tell different species of fireflies apart by their flash patterns?

    sciencefriday:

    Did you know you can tell different species of fireflies apart by their flash patterns?

    (via fastcompany)

    — 1 week ago with 2024 notes
    adteachings:

Advertising Agency: Zulu Alpha Kilo, Toronto, CanadaCreative Director: Zak MrouehArt Directors: Allan Mah, Grant ClelandCopywriter: Nick Asik, George AultPhotographer: Jamie MorrenDigital Imaging: Brandon DysonMac Artists: Greg Heptinstall, Matt ChilderhoseAgency Producers: Kari Macknight Dearborn, Kate SpencerAccount Directors: Dic Dickerson, Nevena DjordjevicDigital Planner: Zoe Neuman
Source: Ads of the World

    adteachings:

    Advertising Agency: Zulu Alpha Kilo, Toronto, Canada
    Creative Director: Zak Mroueh
    Art Directors: Allan MahGrant Cleland
    Copywriter: Nick AsikGeorge Ault
    Photographer: Jamie Morren
    Digital Imaging: Brandon Dyson
    Mac Artists: Greg Heptinstall, Matt Childerhose
    Agency Producers: Kari Macknight DearbornKate Spencer
    Account Directors: Dic DickersonNevena Djordjevic
    Digital Planner: Zoe Neuman

    Source: Ads of the World

    — 1 week ago with 27 notes

    likeafieldmouse:

    Jayson Musson - Halcyon Days (2012) - Mercerized cotton stretched on linen

    (via d-opaminergic)

    — 1 week ago with 1243 notes

    inthecoldlightofmorning:

    Library Porn

    Admont Abbey Library, Austria

    (via caramelpussy)

    — 1 week ago with 37071 notes
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